Living in Bondage: Breaking Free review

Two questions are likely to occupy the mind of a certain kind of viewer watching the sequel to 1992’s Living in Bondage.

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1. How good is it?

2. Almost three decades later, what does it say about the first film’s Christian philosophy?

In any case, when Living in Bondage: Breaking Free opens, it is clearly no longer the 1990s. There is the fancy car being driven, which few engineers could have predicted back then. Then there is the drone shot that took Nollywood filmmakers some time to get right. The car snaking through the vegetation is admirably captured by cinematographer John Demps.

The occupants of the car get to their destination and then we find out that while technology has advanced over the years, not much has changed within the hearts of men seeking wealth.

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Interestingly, the man in the car is not the film’s central character; that would be Nnamdi, an impulsive young man who has left his job because he has struck a deal with a client from his former employers. Let’s call it the spirit of entrepreneurship. Well, it doesn’t go too well and the man heads to his family’s home in Enugu in the manner of all who are defeated by the callousness of a big city.

But he’ll back and when he returns one of the questions that would be asked of him by the city is this: “Do you want this life or rather the one you were born into?”

Read Complete Piece here.

Nigeria’s most acclaimed writer-reviewer. Business: www.criticsandbylines.com.

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